Hemp Packs a Powerful Nutrition Punch

November 13, 2017

As of yesterday, low THC hemp seeds are legal to eat in Australia. You've been able to buy hemp seeds in Australia for some years now, but previously the products were required to carry stickers stating they were not for human consumption. Now I know a number of people who have been making 'home made face scrubs' or feeding hemp seeds to their non existent pets for years, but given the new regulations we will likely see many food products become available over the coming months.

 

Before we dive into the nutrition profile of hemp, it's important to give a little background - low THC hemp seed foods have been assessed as safe for human consumption, and do not contain psychoactive properties. Unlike Marrijuana, hemp has extremely low levels of the mind-altering chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Industrial hemp has THC levels of about 0.03%, compared to marijuana, which can contain up to 30%. Packaging of hemp products can no longer use images or representations of any part of the cannabis plant, other than the seed - this is to make it very clear that hemp and cannabis are two different things.

 

Hemps seeds are small and crunchy, and are usually de-husked before selling. The inside of the seed is white with a creamy, soft texture. Most people with nut allergies have no reaction to the seeds, making them a school-lunch friendly choice. As an added bonus, hemp is also a sustainable, eco friendly crop. It can be grown in many different climates and soil types, and is naturally resistant to many pests, reducing the need for pesticides, herbicides and fungicides. Some farmers use hemp to assist in soil regeneration - it was even used at Chernobyl to remove pollutants and toxins from the soil and groundwater.

 

 

Nutritional Benefits of Hemp Seeds